PARKSVILLE, B.C. STUDENT EXPERIMENT GOING INTO SPACE

Student Experiment Going Into Space
PARKSVILLE, B.C., Canada – January 14, 2019) It’s official! A science experiment designed by five École Ballenas students will go into space. This summer, when the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Mission 13 to the International Space Station (ISS) launches, an experiment, titled Investigating the Growth Patterns of Alfalfa (Medicagosativa) Sprouts in Microgravity: a Potential Nourishment for Future Manned Spaceflight, will be on board.

“We’re very fortunate to be part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP),” enthused Gillian Wilson, Assistant Superintendent, School District 69 (Qualicum). “The experience is preparing today’s learners for tomorrow’s
world. It has been an unprecedented applied learning opportunity that emphasizes science, technology, engineering and math.

Thanks to over $18,000 of funding, made possible by the Karen and Fred Green Fund (held at Vancouver Foundation) and Magellan Aerospace, over 400 students across the school district learned about the microgravity environment of space and created science experiment proposals.”

A local panel of judges reviewed experiment proposals, developed by students in grades 4 to 12, and chose three for submission to the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) based in Maryland U.S.A. The experiment proposals included:
• Will Mold Grow Differently on Bread in a Microgravity Zone?
Arrowview Elementary School. Written by Emily Anderson, Avalon Carey, Liam Einarson, Ethan Gamble, Joshua Gauvin, Evin Izdebski, Novie Pratte, Damien Roberts, Karli Taylor and Jacob Waitson.

• The Growth Rate and Pattern of Bacteria (Bacillus Subtilis) in a Microgravity Environment École Ballenas Secondary. Written by Amanda Litton, David Downey, Caitlin Holme, Connor Litton, and Nasuka Nakazawa.
• Investigating the Growth Patterns of Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa) Sprouts in Microgravity: a Potential Nourishment for Future Manned Spaceflights
École Ballenas Secondary. Written by Marco Loffredi, Victor Kamel, Robert Lachance, Alexander Marshall and Filipe Pereira.
From the submissions, the SSEP Step 2 Review Board chose Investigating the Growth Patterns of Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa) Sprouts in Microgravity: a Potential Nourishment for Future Manned Spaceflights to be conducted on the International Space Station.
“Students, who proposed the chosen experiment, are busy making preparations,” explained Carl Savage, Science Teacher and SSEP Community Program Director, School District 69 (Qualicum).

“They are working to refine their experiment and equip two micro labs; one lab will journey to the ISS and the other will remain on Earth. While astronauts
are conducting the Alfalfa Sprout experiment in space, Ballenas students will be conducting the same experiment at school.” Adding to the excitement and “real-world” experience, students plan to raise funds to view the ISS launch at
Kennedy Space Center in Florida and present their findings at the SSEP National Conference in Washington D.C.
ABOUT THE STUDENT SPACEFLIGHT EXPERIMENTS PROGRAM
The Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP) is an initiative of the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE), located in the United States, and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, which works internationally. It is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp, PBC and NanoRacks, LLC, which are working with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the

International Space Station as a National Laboratory.