B.C. – You Don’t Have a Choice!!

UPCOMING CHANGES FOR CONSUMERS WHO ARE BUYING OR SELLING -

 YOU ARE NOT GOING TO HAVE A CHOICE AS TO WHO REPRESENTS YOU

 Mr. Michael Noseworthy, the Superintendent of Real Estate has given directions to the Real Estate Council of B.C. [RECBC] to implement changes that are supposedly for the protection of buyers and sellers. These changes are to be effective on March15th, 2018.

 We all know that Limited Dual Agency will be forbidden come March 15, 2018 as well. This means there is a ban on one REALTOR® representing a buyer and seller in the same transaction. Okay, we get it.

However, one of the major concerns to REALTORS® is the new rule with respect to what is called “double recusal”. Recuse means “to remove oneself from participation to avoid a conflict of interest.” Here is an example of how “double recusal” could apply if you are going to sell your house.

You, the sellers have decided on offering your home for sale with REALTOR® Mr. Agent. You interviewed three other REALTORS® and after serious consideration you selected Mr. Agent to represent you. 

Mr. Agent was highly recommended to you; has been in the profession for over 25 years, has a huge clientele base since his business is built on referrals from satisfied buyers and sellers and knows everything about the neighborhood where your home is located. He is perfect to represent you and you trust him.

You told Mr. Agent what you were hoping to sell your home for, you agreed to his marketing plan, you told him all your personal information, why you were selling and what you hoped to buy. You told Mr. Agent your mortgage amount owing and other confidential information.

You chose Mr. Agent because of his ethics, his professionalism, his negotiating plan and abilities. You trusted Mr. Agent and wanted him to represent you in the sale of your most important asset, your home.

You then asked Mr. Agent if he had any buyers in his clientele list that might be interested in buying their home. This is where the concern for the consumers comes into play.

Mr. Agent tells the sellers that yes, in fact he does have a couple that he just sold their home and he also knows another buyer that might be really interested as well.

HERE IS WHERE THE PROBLEM EXISTS

Mr. Agent must tell the sellers that he cannot represent either of his possible buyers because he also knows all the buyer’s personal information. Remember, he also knows all your confidential information. It is called “double recusal” [avoiding a conflict of interest re confidentiality].

The new rules state that Mr. Agent cannot represent you as the sellers and the potential buyers he knows, because he has confidential information about both parties.He will however, recommend the buyers to another REALTOR® to represent them.

This is all good unless these buyers really do want to make an offer on your home.They have seen many other houses for sale but now they love your home. They want their referred REALTOR® to make an offer on your property.

Here’s where it gets very complicated under the new rules and where you as sellers and/or buyers cannot choose your own representation for your real estate needs.You hired Mr. Agent to represent you with the most important and complex transaction of your life.

The primary agency duties Mr. Agent must uphold always are: loyalty, avoiding conflicts of interest, full disclosure and confidentiality.  The one duty that never expires is the continuing duty of confidentiality.

These new rules will take away the consumers choice of representation in the sale/purchase of their real estate.

Because Mr. Agent knows you and your confidential information if the REALTOR® representing the buyers brings you an offer on your home — according to the new rules, there is the problem of a conflict of interest. Mr. Agent knows both parties confidential information.

he rules mean that when the Buyer’s REALTOR® presents an offer, Mr. Agent is required to step away from representing you, the sellers. That’s right; Mr. Agent cannot represent you the sellers because of the supposed conflict of interest. 

Is that allowing you the consumer, to choose who represents you?

Even if you as sellers signed a disclosure that Mr. Agent does have confidential information, but he will not share that with you the sellers; that will not be allowed. He would still not be able to represent you.

Well, what if we even had the buyers sign they are okay with their referred REALTOR® representing them and to go ahead with Mr. Agent representing the sellers. No, this is still not allowed. So now you the sellers must wait until the Brokerage of Mr. Agent appoints another designated agent to step in for him.

Yes, you had hired Mr. Agent based on his knowledge, professionalism, ethics, recommendations, trustworthiness and most importantly on his negotiating skills to help bring you the highest offer possible. You have no option or choice of who can represent you if Mr. Agent also knows confidential information about a prospective buyer.

Did you know this was coming into effect March 15th, 2018? How do you feel about not having your own choice of who works for you when you are buying or selling?

The new rules are stating that you the sellers who hired Mr. Agent will now have to change to another REALTOR® who you do not know – how are their negotiating skills, what do they know about you and your concerns. 

This is the most critical negotiation of your lifetime and you cannot have the REALTOR® you originally contracted with look after your needs, negotiate on your behalf and explain step by step what is involved.

If there are subjects Mr. Agent won’t be allowed to advise you on their validity in the sale of your home; the length of time allowed for the subject removal, the date of closing [the day you get paid] – does it meet your needs and is there enough time between being paid and moving out to allow you to pay for the new home you are purchasing. 

What if there is an unauthorized suite that needs to be disclosed properly to protect both the sellers and buyers – does this new ‘fill-in’ agent know all about this?

Sure, let’s just change your representative in the middle of the most critical part of selling your home. Demanding Mr. Agent step aside from the negotiations because he may know some ‘confidential’ information about the buyers is a total disservice to you.

This newly appointed REALTOR® most likely knows nothing about the listing information and nothing about you the sellers – how is that protecting you? Who is looking after you – you chose Mr. Agent to represent and protect you throughout the sale of your property but due to the new rules you have absolutely NO CHOICE in the matter?

How is this fair to any members of the public?

This proposed new rule being brought down by the Superintendent of Real Estate and implemented by the Real Estate Council of B.C. eliminates the public’s choice of representation. Are you okay with it?

Please voice your comments/questions/concerns to the following regulatory bodies.

advisor@recbc.ca or info@recbc.ca

RealEstate@gov.bc.ca ATTENTION: MR. MICHAEL NOSEWORTHY

https://www.recbc.ca

RE/MAX #1 6 Years Running

 

RE/MAX continues to shine in the annual Entrepreneur Franchise 500 ranking of top franchises.

In addition to being the No. 1 ranked real estate franchise for the 15th time, RE/MAX climbed into the survey’s Top 5 for the very first time. It joined McDonald’s, 7-11, Dunkin’ Donuts and The UPS store in the elite five of household brand names.

More than 115,000 agents enjoy the competitive advantages of being with the industry’s top franchise brand. And who benefits from the skills of those agents? Homebuyers and sellers in countries around the globe.

Nobody in the world sells more real estate than RE/MAX, as measured by residential transactions. There’s a reason for that. And it starts with productive, hustling, all-in agents who strive to be the best at what they do.

VIREB Posts the Strongest December on Record

January Raindrops

NANAIMO, BC – The Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB) reports that on a seasonally adjusted basis, the board had its busiest December on record, with 667 housing units changing hands last month.

Sales of single-family homes increased by 35 per cent from December 2016. Annually, 5,612 single-family homes sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System in 2017 compared to 6,059 the previous year, a decrease of seven per cent. However, this reduction reflects the market returning to more normal levels from the unprecedented sales activity generated in 2016.

Inventory of single-family homes dropped to 762 in December, the lowest recorded since VIREB began tracking inventory in 1999. The supply of apartments and townhouses dipped by 13 per cent and 33 per cent, respectively. Diminishing housing supply and high consumer demand are driving rising benchmark prices of single-family homes, apartments, and townhouses in all markets.

The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) notes that the housing market in B.C. is thriving due to strong economic fundamentals, such as robust retail sales, job growth, and population growth. BCREA’s Fourth Quarter Housing Forecast states that the provincial economy is on track to expand by 3.8 per cent in 2017, the fourth consecutive year of three per cent or more real GDP growth. The cumulative effect has fuelled employment growth to its strongest performance in almost 20 years, with the provincial jobless rate at its lowest level in nearly a decade.

However, while provincial economic conditions appear to be on a sound footing, BCREA expects economic growth to slow in 2018, expanding at a respectable 2.8 per cent, but lower than we have seen in some time. The province’s housing market will face additional economic headwinds in 2018, with rising interest rates eroding affordability and Guideline B-20 making it harder for some buyers to qualify for a mortgage.

Janice Stromar, 2017 VIREB President, notes that VIREB’S record December shows that consumers are still highly motivated to buy a home, but she encourages sellers to list their property now before mitigating economic factors have an impact on housing activity.“My advice to prospective sellers is not to delay listing their home until the spring,” says Stromar. “The VIREB area has been a sellers’ market for a long time, but we know that it cannot continue indefinitely.”

That said, since the current VIREB market still favours sellers, connecting with a local REALTOR® is especially crucial in a competitive housing market.

“REALTORS have specialized knowledge of their communities that can help streamline the buying and selling process to ensure the best possible outcome for our clients,” says Stromar.

In December 2017, the benchmark price of a single-family home in the VIREB area reached $466,400, up 17 per cent from one year ago. (Benchmark pricing tracks the value of a typical home in the reported area.) The benchmark price of an apartment last month rose to $284,400, up 28 per cent board-wide from the previous year, while the benchmark price of a townhouse hit $370,700, a 23 per cent increase from December 2016.

The December 2017 benchmark price of a single-family home in the Campbell River area was $375,100, an increase of 20 per cent over December 2016. In the Comox Valley, the benchmark price hit $467,400, up 19 per cent from last year. Duncan reported a benchmark price of $418,000, an increase of 16 per cent compared to December 2016. Nanaimo’s benchmark price rose 17 per cent to $500,500 while the Parksville-Qualicum area saw its benchmark price increase by 16 per cent to $524,900. The cost of a benchmark home in Port Alberni was $249,800, up 16 per cent from one year ago. 

Lack of Inventory Continues to Drive Housing Market

December 1, 2017 – The Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB) reports that single-family home sales last month dipped by seven per cent from October but rose 23 per cent from November 2016.

Last month, 426 properties sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System compared to 346 one year ago and 458 in October. Inventory of single-family homes decreased by 13 per cent month over month and four per cent from one year ago. Although the supply of single-family homes for sale has been steadily rising each month since VIREB hit a historic low of 859 in December 2016, inventory dipped in October and once again in November.

The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) notes that the housing market in B.C. is thriving due to strong economic fundamentals, such as robust retail sales, job growth, and population growth. British Columbia’s economy continues to lead the country, with GDP in 2018 expected to hit 3.8 per cent. Government policy decisions, including slightly higher interest rates and the new mortgage stress test (Guideline B-20), could affect the housing market in 2018, but it is too early to say in what way.

Introduced by the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI), Guideline B-20 – which takes effect on January 1, 2018 – extends the requirement for a mortgage stress test to all home buyers, even those who have more than 20 per cent as a down payment. However, some mortgage lenders – including credit unions such as Vancity, Coast Capital, and Prospera – do not come under OSFI’s jurisdiction, as they are provincially regulated by the Financial Institutions Commission. Unlike banks, which are federally regulated, credit unions in B.C. are not required to “stress test” their mortgage applicants. Therefore, buyers can get a mortgage with a credit union and income-qualify at the rate they will be paying, which may give them more purchasing power. But they would still have to pass the usual debt-service tests.

Don McClintock, VIREB President-Elect, reports that sales are still brisk throughout the VIREB area. Lack of inventory continues to drive home sales, and there are no apparent signs of buyer fatigue. However, multiple offers have decreased slightly in some markets, which could be good news for buyers.

“It’s emotionally draining when you continue to find, and then lose, the perfect home in a multiple-offer situation,” says McClintock. “Buyers will certainly welcome any relief on that front.”

However, the VIREB area is still a sellers’ market, notes McClintock, which makes this an optimum time to sell. He adds that connecting with a local REALTOR® is especially crucial in a competitive housing market.

“Our current market conditions can be confusing and chaotic for buyers and sellers, but REALTORS® have specialized knowledge of their communities that can help streamline the process to ensure the best possible outcome,” says McClintock.

In November 2017, the benchmark price of a single-family home in the VIREB area was $463,200, up 17 per cent from one year ago. (Benchmark pricing tracks the value of a typical home in the reported area.) The benchmark price of an apartment last month rose to $274,100, up 26 per cent board-wide from the previous year, while the benchmark price of a townhouse was $359,200, a 21 per cent increase from November 2016.

The November 2017 benchmark price of a single-family home in the Campbell River area was $366,300, an increase of 18 per cent over November 2016. In the Comox Valley, the benchmark price hit $467,200, up 21 per cent from last year. Duncan reported a benchmark price of $410,700, an increase of 15 per cent compared to November 2016. Nanaimo’s benchmark price rose 14 per cent to $497,200 while the Parksville-Qualicum area saw its benchmark price increase by 16 per cent to $525,600. The price of a benchmark home in Port Alberni was $252,700, up 18 per cent from one year ago.

Buyer Demand and Low Inventory Driving Brisk Housing Market

 

NANAIMO, BC – The Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB) reports that single-family home sales in October 2017 rose by 16 per cent from one year ago but dipped 10 per cent from September.

Last month, 460 properties sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System compared to 398 one year ago and 511 in September.

When looking at these sales figures, however, it is important to note that 2016 was a banner year for real estate. Some market correction was expected in 2017, but sales activity in the VIREB area is still robust. Further, VIREB attributes most of the decline in sales numbers to ongoing inventory challenges. In fact, although the supply of single-family homes for sale has been steadily rising each month since VIREB hit a historic low of 859 in December 2016, inventory in October was just 1,138, down two per cent from last year and eight per cent from September.

The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that the housing market in British Columbia (B.C.), particularly in the southern half of the province, continues to thrive due to strong economic fundamentals. B.C.’s GDP is currently tracking at four per cent and is expected to average 3.7 per cent for the year. Government policy decisions, including slightly higher interest rates and the new mortgage stress test, could affect the housing market in 2018, but it is too early to say in what way. These attempts to temper rising home prices – aimed mainly at overheated markets in Vancouver and Toronto – will likely be counterbalanced by demographic factors, such as baby boomers entering their retirement years, millennials purchasing their first homes, and inter-provincial migration.

Janice Stromar, 2017 VIREB President, states that sales are still brisk throughout the VIREB area.

“Looking purely at statistics, it appears that the market is cooling, but the opposite is true,” says Stromar.

“Lack of inventory is certainly tempering sales, but what is available sells faster and for more money.” Stromar adds that multiple offers are still occurring regularly, even on condominiums, townhouses, and mobile homes, which is unusual for the VIREB area.

However, sellers still need to price their homes realistically. “Although many properties are selling above list price, sellers must set a reasonable price because consumers are savvy and may not look at an overpriced home,” says Stromar. Connecting with a local REALTOR® is especially crucial in a competitive housing market, adds Stromar.

“Our current market conditions can be confusing and chaotic for buyers and sellers, but REALTORS® have specialized knowledge of their communities that can help streamline the process to ensure the best possible outcome while mitigating associated risks,” says Stromar.

In October 2017, the benchmark price of a single-family home in the VIREB area rose to $463,800, up 17 per cent from one year ago. (Benchmark pricing tracks the value of a typical home in the reported area.) The benchmark price of an apartment last month rose to $272,300, up 28 per cent board-wide from the previous year, while the benchmark price of a townhouse hit $360,100, a 22 per cent increase from 2016.

The October 2017 benchmark price of a single-family home in the Campbell River area was $366,800, an increase of 19 per cent over October 2016. In the Comox Valley, the benchmark price hit $466,200, up 20 per cent from last year. Duncan reported a benchmark price of $409,500, an increase of 14 per cent compared to October 2016. Nanaimo’s benchmark price broke the $500,000 mark, rising 14 per cent to hit $501,400. The Parksville-Qualicum area saw its benchmark price increase by 17 per cent to $524,900, while the price of a benchmark home in Port Alberni was $253,600, up 18 per cent from one year ago.

Hey – We’re Still Affordable

 

MEDIA RELEASE

June 16, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

VANCOUVER ISLAND REAL ESTATE BOARD RELEASES 2016 BUYER PROFILE

NANAIMO, BC –             The Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB) has released its 2016 Buyer Profile, tracking the who, what, and where of residential property purchases north of Victoria on Vancouver Island.

The 2016 Buyer Profile provides statistical information summarizing “home characteristics” for VIREB’s overall board area, as well as for the various sub-areas within its boundaries. These include Duncan-Cowichan Valley, Nanaimo, Port Alberni-West Coast, Parksville-Qualicum, Comox Valley, Campbell River, North Island, and the Islands.

BCREA Chief Economist Cameron Muir notes that the profile reveals interesting demographic trends.

“At 81.5 per cent, owner-occupiers continue to be the primary buyers in the VIREB area. Investment purchases rose slightly from 2015 but still represent only 2.7 per cent of the market. Purchases of recreation homes dipped slightly in 2016 compared to the previous year, comprising just 1.3 per cent of home sales,” says Muir.

Despite rising prices in the VIREB area, housing is still more affordable compared to the Lower Mainland and Victoria, notes Muir.

“In 2016, 26 per cent of homes that sold were under $250,000, 51 per cent were under $350,000, and 68 per cent sold for under $500,000, “says Muir. “Only 1.4 per cent of homes in the VIREB area sold for more than $1 million dollars.”

At 58 per cent, single-family detached homes represented the majority of purchases in 2016, with condominium apartments accounting for 10 per cent of purchases and townhomes garnering 7.2 per cent of total home sales. The percentage of first-time buyers in 2016 was 17.5 per cent in the Cowichan Valley. 17.9 per cent in Port Alberni-West Coast, and 22 per cent in Nanaimo. Just 8.4 per cent of purchasers in Parksville-Qualicum were first-time buyers, not surprising since this area is a particularly attractive location for retirees. For the overall board area, home purchases by retirees remained brisk but did drop to 57 per cent last year from 62 per cent in 2015.

Janice Stromar, 2017 VIREB President, notes that the data presented in the buyer profile is not surprising. The range of residential property options is tremendously appealing to both local and out-of-province buyers, as are the Vancouver Island lifestyle, climate, and amenities.

 

“Vancouver Island delivers the best of West Coast living in a more affordable and relaxed setting than what you’ll find on the Lower Mainland,” says Stromar. “And, whether you’re a first-time home buyer, a retiree, or an investor, you’re sure to find a property that works for you.”

Other trends noted in the report include the following.

  • Nearly two-thirds of home buyers (65.7 per cent) found their property through a REALTOR® and/or REALTOR.ca.
  • The number of Alberta buyers increased slightly, growing from 9.7 per cent in 2015 to 10.4 per cent in 2016.
  • In terms of aggregated buyer origin, home purchasers break down as follows: o 31.6 per cent from Vancouver Island;
    • 41.6 per cent from elsewhere in British Columbia (Vancouver and the Fraser Valley make up 27.8 per cent of that figure);
    • 24.2 per cent from elsewhere in Canada; and o 2.6 per cent from outside of Canada.

VIREB’s 2016 Buyer Profile also highlights regional differences. The report is available online at www.vireb.com. – 30          -

ABOUT VIREB

VIREB represents approximately 1,000 REALTOR® members in nearly 90 member offices on Vancouver Island, from the Malahat in the south to the northern tip.

For more information, please contact:

Nora Cserny

Communications Department

Vancouver Island Real Estate Board

250.390.4212

ncserny@vireb.com

 

Low Inventory Continues to Write its Own Sales Story

VIREB NANAIMO, BC – The Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB) reports that in April 2017, 478 single-family properties sold on the MLS® System compared to 659 last April, a decrease of 27 per cent.Month over month, sales edged slightly lower from March.

Inventory of single-family homes declined by 33 per cent from April 2016, with 1,122 active listings available last month compared to 1,694 one year ago. Additional listings have entered the market since VIREB hit its historic inventory low of 859 in December 2016. Active listings rose to 893 in January, 949 in February, and 1,023 in March. However, properties are being snapped up almost as soon as they hit the market.

“Properly priced single-family homes between $400,000 and $600,000 rarely last more than 48 hours and usually generate multiple offers, with many selling above list price,” says Janice Stromar, 2017 VIREB President.

The real estate market on Vancouver Island has been telling the same story for several months now, notes Stromar.

“Limited supply, combined with high demand, means it has been a sellers’ market for months. Sellers are in the drivers’ seat, and the lack of inventory is frustrating buyers and REALTORS® alike,”says Stromar. “That said, even though we are in a sellers’ market, homeowners still need to price their home correctly. Houses can sit unsold for months if they are priced higher than the market will bear.”

She adds that sellers are not immune to the frustration that buyers are experiencing because it is hard to sell your home if you cannot find another property to buy. Still, homeowners reluctant to sell due to concerns of housing availability should make the most of this hot market.

“Real estate is cyclical, and consumers need to take advantage of these market conditions because they won’t last forever,” says Stromar. “When the market does correct itself – and it always does – it usually happens without warning.”

She adds that connecting with a local REALTOR® is especially crucial in a competitive housing market.

“This kind of market can be confusing and chaotic for buyers and sellers, but REALTORS® have specialized knowledge of their communities that can help clarify the situation,” says Stromar. “We’re also equipped with sales tools, such as custom analytics, to help buyers formulate winning offers and ensure sellers receive maximum dollars for their home.”

In April 2017, the benchmark price of a single-family home in the VIREB area was $419,100, up 17.5 per cent from one year ago. Prices increased in every zone, ranging from 13 per cent in Duncan to 22 per cent in Nanaimo. The benchmark price of an apartment in April rose 28 per cent board-wide from the previous year, but the highest increase was in Campbell River, at 39 per cent. The townhouse market also strengthened in April, posting a 21 per cent increase board-wide.

The April 2017 benchmark price of a single-family home in the Campbell River area was $335,000, an increase of 18 per cent over April 2016. In the Comox Valley, the benchmark price hit $415,800, up 16 per cent from 2016. Duncan reported a benchmark price of $354,400, an increase of 13 per cent compared to April 2016. Nanaimo’s benchmark price rose 22 per cent to $461,600 while the Parksville-Qualicum area saw its benchmark price increase by 20 per cent to $477,700. The price of a benchmark home in Port Alberni hit $227,400, up 19 per cent from one year ago.

VIREB – Still a Seller’s Market

March 1, 2017 Despite Additional Inventory, the VIREB Area is Still a Sellers’ Market

WELCOME MARCH!

NANAIMO, BC – In February 2017, 347 single-family homes sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System compared to 406 last February, a decrease of 15 per cent.

Sales rose by 42 per cent from January 2017, which saw 245 sales. Inventory of single-family homes declined by 38 per cent from February 2016, with 949 active listings compared to 1,529 one year ago.However, the 949 available properties reflect a six per cent increase over January, an encouraging development since the lack of inventory continues to challenge consumers and REALTORS® in the VIREB area.

The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that strong economic fundamentals are fuelling housing demand throughout British Columbia, with the B.C. economy continuing to outpace the rest of Canada. Among other factors, increased population growth is a significant force driving the provincial housing market.

“In the first three-quarters of 2016, net migration to British Columbia hit 50,000 people,” says Cameron Muir, BCREA Chief Economist. “Although most of those residents will end up on the Lower Mainland, the effects of this influx will inevitably trickle into other markets.”

Although BCREA expects the provincial economy to weaken somewhat this year, consumer confidence and job growth should continue to have a net positive effect on the housing market. After dipping in late 2016 and early 2017, overall sales activity in the province appears to be trending upwards again, and that is certainly happening on Vancouver Island.

In fact, sales in the VIREB area would no doubt be much higher if there were more properties available, says Janice Stromar, 2017 VIREB President.

“The Nanaimo market in February was busier than I’ve ever seen,” says Stromar. “Single-family homes in the $450,000 range are practically flying out the door, and multiple offers are the norm, not the exception.”

The VIREB area has been a sellers’ market for several months now, and Stromar encourages people to list their homes now.

“Real estate is cyclical, and consumers need to take advantage of these market conditions because they won’t last forever,” says Stromar.

She adds that connecting with a local REALTOR® is especially crucial in a competitive housing market. REALTORS® have specialized knowledge of their communities and are equipped with sales tools, such as custom analytics, to help buyers formulate winning offers and help sellers receive maximum dollars for their home.

In February 2017, the benchmark price of a single-family home in the VIREB area was $403,100, up 18 per cent from one year ago. Prices increased in every zone, ranging from 14 per cent in Duncan and Port Alberni to 25 per cent in Nanaimo. The benchmark price of an apartment in February rose 22 per cent board-wide from the previous year, but the highest increases were seen in Parksville-Qualicum (24 per cent), the Comox Valley (26 per cent), and Campbell River (26 per cent). The townhouse market also strengthened in January, posting a 20 per cent increase board-wide.

The February 2017 benchmark price of a single-family home in the Campbell River area was $318,100, an increase of 17 per cent over February 2016. In the Comox Valley, the benchmark price hit $401,000, up 17 per cent from 2016. Duncan reported a benchmark price of $345,500, an increase of 14 per cent compared to February 2016. Nanaimo’s benchmark price rose 25 per cent to $444,400 while the Parksville-Qualicum area saw its benchmark price increase by 20 per cent to $454,100. The price of a benchmark home in Port Alberni stayed the same as in January but did rise by 14 per cent from one year ago.

Another Rule

 

A lot of people seem to have missed hearing about this one (maybe because it’s about taxes) but it could have negative consequences if you fail to pay attention.

 

On October 3, 2016, the Government announced an administrative change to Canada Revenue Agency’s reporting requirements for the sale of a principal residence.

When you sell your principal residence or when you are considered to have sold it, usually you do not have to report the sale on your income tax and benefit return and you do not have to pay tax on any gain from the sale. This is the case if you are eligible for the full income tax exemption (principal residence exemption) because the property was your principal residence for every year you owned it.

Starting with the 2016 tax year, generally due by late April 2017, you will be required to report basic information (date of acquisition, proceeds of disposition and description of the property) on your income tax and benefit return when you sell your principal residence to claim the full principal residence exemption.

The Potential Implications

If you fail to report the sale of a residence in 2016 or later years, you won’t be entitled to the PRE. If you forget to designate a property as your principal residence in the year of sale (for 2016 and later years), you should ask CRA to amend your tax return for that year. CRA will often accept a late designation but penalties could apply (the penalty could be $100 for each complete month the designation is late, or $8,000, whichever is less).  For further information check out the following links:

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/gncy/bdgt/2016/qa11-eng.html

http://www.thor.ca/blog/2016/10/new-tax-reporting-rules-for-principal-residence-sales/

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact us.”

Inventory Challenges Continue to Moderate Sales Activity

Inventory Challenges Continue to Moderate Sales Activity

Loving Vancouver Island

 

NANAIMO, BC – In January 2017, 245 single-family homes sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System compared to 258 last January, a decrease of five per cent.

Sales were virtually unchanged from December, which saw 243 sales. VIREB attributes this static sales activity to inventory challenges rather than insufficient demand. Active listings of single-family homes did increase by four per cent in January to 893 from December’s 852, which typically happens at the beginning of the year, with 389 properties coming onto the market last month. However, inventory is still down by 38 per cent from one year ago, a significant reduction from the 1,431 available properties in January 2016.

The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that housing demand in the VIREB area and throughout British Columbia is being driven by a provincial economy that continues to outperform the rest of Canada.

Although BCREA does expect B.C.’s economy to weaken somewhat this year, strong job and population growth will continue to have a net positive effect on the housing market. “Although BCREA anticipates that less robust economic conditions combined with government policy constraints will slow housing demand by more than 15 per cent in 2017, unit sales should remain well above the 10-year average of 85,000,” says Cameron Muir, BCREA Chief Economist. “Sales in the VIREB area this year will likely trend lower than in 2016, but this is merely the market returning to more normal levels from last year’s unprecedented sales activity.”

Janice Stromar, 2017 VIREB President, reaffirms that housing sales in the VIREB area would be much higher if there were more homes available. “We’ve been in a sellers’ market for several months now, with buyers snapping up available properties and multiple offers a common occurrence,” says Stromar. “But real estate is cyclical, and these conditions won’t last forever. If you’ve been thinking of selling, I strongly encourage you to take advantage of our current market situation.

” Stromar adds that connecting with a local REALTOR® is especially crucial in a competitive housing market. REALTORS® have specialized knowledge of their communities and are equipped with sales tools, such as custom analytics, to help you develop a winning strategy for buying or selling a home.

In January 2017, the benchmark price of a single-family home in the VIREB area was $400,000, up 18 per cent from one year ago. Prices increased in every zone, ranging from 14 per cent in Duncan to 21 per cent in the Comox Valley and Nanaimo.

The benchmark price of an apartment rose 21 per cent board-wide from the previous year, but the highest increases were posted in Parksville-Qualicum (25 per cent), the Comox Valley (27 per cent), and Campbell River (28 per cent).

The townhouse market also strengthened in January, posting an 18 per cent increase board-wide and high double-digit increases in every zone, from 16 per cent in Nanaimo to 26 per cent in Parksville-Qualicum.

The January 2017 benchmark price of a single-family home in the Campbell River area was $311,900, an increase of 16 per cent over January 2016. In the Comox Valley, the benchmark price was $400,400, up 21 per cent from 2016. Duncan reported a benchmark price of $348,000, an increase of 14 per cent compared to January 2016. Nanaimo’s benchmark price rose 21 per cent to $434,100 while the Parksville-Qualicum area saw its benchmark price rise by 18 per cent to $457,800. The price of a benchmark home in Port Alberni hit $216,100, up 16 per cent from one year ago.